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The Ashtanga Vinyasa Yoga is a style of yoga codified and popularized by K. PattabhiJois during the 20th century which is often promoted as a modern-day form of classical Indian yoga.Ashtanga means eight limbs or branches, of which asana or physical yoga posture is merely one branch, breath or pranayama is another. Both PattabhiJois and SharathJois, his grandson, encourage practice of Ashtanga Yoga - all eight limbs. The first two limbs - Yamas and Niyamas - are given special emphasis to be practiced in conjunction with the 3rd and 4th limbs (asana and pranayama).

Sri K. PattabhiJo is began his yoga studies in 1927 at the age of 12, and by 1948 had established the Ashtanga Yoga Research Institute for teaching the specific yoga practice known as Ashtanga (Sanskrit for "eight-limbed") Yoga. Ashtanga Yoga is named after the eight limbs of yoga mentioned in the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali.

"Power yoga" is a generic term that may refer to any type of aerobically vigorous yoga exercise derived from Ashtanga yoga.

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Hatha Yoga is a branch of yoga. The word haṭha literally means "force" and thus alludes to a system of physical techniques. Hatha yoga is associated with the DashanamiSampradaya and the mystical figure of DattatreyaIn the 20th century, hatha yoga, particularly asanas (the physical postures), became popular throughout the world as a form of physical exercise, and is now colloquially termed as simply "yoga". The Hatha pradīpikạ was composed by Svātmārāma in the 15th century CE as a compilation of the earlier hatha yoga texts.

The Hatha Yoga Pradipika and the Gherandasamhita are derived from older Sanskrit texts. In Hatha Yoga Pradipika, Swatmarama introduces his system as preparatory stage for physical purification that the body practices for higher meditation or Yoga. It is based on asanas (postures) and pranayama (breathing techniques).

Hatha Yoga Pradipika lists 35 great Hatha Yoga siddhas or masters; AdiNatha, Matsyendranath and Gorakshanath. It includes information about shatkarma (purification), asana (postures), pranayama (subtle energy control), chakras (centers of energy), kundalini (instinct), bandhas (muscle force), kriyas (techniques; manifestations of kundalini), shakti (sacred force), nadis (channels), and mudras (symbolic gestures) among other topics.

Yoga's combined focus on mindfulness, breathing and physical movements brings health benefits with regular participation. Yoga participants report better sleep, increased energy levels and muscle tone, relief from muscle pain and stiffness, improved circulation and overall better general health. The breathing aspect of yoga can benefit heart rate and blood pressure.

The 2012 "Yoga in America" survey, conducted by Harris Interactive on behalf of Yoga Journal, shows that the number of adult practitioners in the US is 20.4 million, or 8.7 percent. The survey reported that 44 percent of those not practicing yoga said they are interested in trying it.

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Sivananda Yoga, after teachings of Swami Sivananda, is a non-proprietary form of hatha yoga in which the training focuses on preserving the health and wellness of the practitioner. Sivananda Yoga teachers are all graduates of the Sivananda Yoga Teacher Training Course, and students widely range in age and degrees of ability. Unlike Ashtangavinyasa yoga's more athletic program involving Bandhas, Sivananda training revolves around frequent relaxation, and emphasizes full, yogic breathing.

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Power Yoga

The concept of Power Yoga has been getting some buzz, but a lot of people are confused as to what the practice actually entails. The term was first coined in the 1990s, and many consider it to be the beginning of the "gym yoga" trend. But these days, everyone's got their own take on what really constitutes a Power Yoga practice. Some rooms are heated, while others keep it cool. Some teachers follow the same series of poses, while others mix things up every class. The best way to get a feel for any Power Yoga is to talk to a teacher beforehand to see what her class is all about. But with all these things considered, there are some definite underlying themes that are evident in the majority of Power Yoga classes. Here are four you should know before you power through one of these Energy, vigor

  • The spirit or soul

Of these meanings, the concept of "vital air" is used by Bhattacharyya to describe the concept as used in Sanskrit texts dealing with prāṇāyāma. Thomas McEvilley translates prāṇa as "spirit-energy".The breath is understood to be its most subtle material form, but is also believed to be present in the blood, and most concentrated in men's semen and women's vaginal fluid.

Monier-Williams defines the compound prāṇāyāma as"(m., also pl.) N. of the three 'breath-exercises' performed during Saṃdhyā (See pūrak, rechak (English: retch or throw out), kumbhak". This technical definition refers to a particular system of classes for the first time!

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Iyengar Yoga, named after and developed by B. K. S. Iyengar, is a form of Hatha Yoga that has an emphasis on detail, precision and alignment in the performance of posture (asana) and breath control (pranayama). The development of strength, mobility and stability is gained through the asanas.

B.K.S. Iyengar has systematised over 200 classical yoga poses and 14 different types of Pranayama (with variations of many of them) ranging from the basic to advanced. This helps ensure that students progress gradually by moving from simple poses to more complex ones and develop their mind, body and spirit through a step-by-step approach

Iyengar Yoga often makes use of props, such as belts, blocks, and blankets, as aids in performing asanas (postures). The props enable students to perform the asanas correctly, minimising the risk of injury or strain, and making the postures accessible to both young and old.

Iyengar Yoga is firmly based on the traditional eight limbs of yoga as expounded by Patanjali in his Yoga Sutras.

 

Asana Pranayama

In yoga, refers both to the place in which a practitioner (yogi if male, yogini if female) sits and the posture in which he or she sits. In the Yoga SutrasPatanjali defines "asana" as "to be seated in a position that is firm, but relaxed".[2] Patanjali mentions the ability to sit for extended periods as one of the eight limbs of his system, known as ashtanga yoga.

Asanas are also performed as physical exercise where they are sometimes referred to as "yoga postures" or "yoga positions". Some asanas are arguably performed by many practitioners just for health purposes. Asanas do promote good health, although in different ways compared to physical exercises, "placing the physical body in positions that cultivate also awareness, relaxation and concentration". Prāṇāyāma (Sanskritप्राणायाम prāṇāyāma) is a Sanskrit word alternatively translated as "extension of the prāṇa (breath or life force)" or "breath control." The word is composed from two Sanskrit words: prana meaning life force (noted particularly as the breath), and either yama (to restrain or control the prana, implying a set of breathing techniques where the breath is intentionally altered in order to produce specific results) or the negative form ayāma, meaning to extend or draw out (as in extension of the life force). It is a yogic discipline with origins in ancient India.

Prāṇāyāma (Devanagariप्राणायाम prāṇāyāma) is a Sanskrit compound.

V. S. Apte provides fourteen different meanings for the word prāṇa (Devanagariप्राण, prāṇa) including these:

  • Breath, respiration
  • The breath of life, vital air, principle of life (usually plural in this sense, there being five such vital airs generally assumed, but three, six, seven, nine, and even ten are also spoken of) breath control with three processes as explained by Bhattacharyya: pūrak (to take the breath inside), kumbhak (to retain it), and rechak (to discharge it). There are also other processes of prāṇāyāma in addition to this three-step model. Macdonell gives the etymology as prāṇa + āyāma and defines it as "m. suspension of breath (sts. pl.)"

Apte's definition of āyāmaḥ derives it from ā + yām and provides several variant meanings for it when used in compounds. The first three meanings have to do with "length", "expansion, extension", and "stretching, extending", but in the specific case of use in the compound prāṇāyāma he defines āyāmaḥ as meaning "restrain, control, stopping".

An alternative etymology for the compound is cited by Ramamurti Mishra, who says that :

Expansion of individual energy into cosmic energy is called prāṇāyāma (prāṇa, energy + ayām, expansion).

 

Yoga Wheel

The Original Yoga Wheel

World's first Yoga Wheel designed to help stretch and release tension and muscular tightness in the back, chest, shoulders, abdomen and hip flexors.Our Original yoga Wheels are designed to be used as a back roller to stretch, massage and align your spine. These wheels are perfect for the absolute beginner to the advanced yogi. Our Original wheels offer a gentle support as you lie back and breathe. This range of wheel has a bit of give when you roll, offering a spine hugging stretch as you roll back and forth. Not only will these wheels open and assist in flexibilty, they  can also be used to create stability and strength. 

 

Contact Information

  • Trika Yog CO.,Ltd
  • 9/9 @Sathorn Building 5th fl
  • South Sathorn Rd, Yannava, Sathron
  • 02-307-8698
  • ID No. 0105558168187
  • +66 63 54 656 99, +66 61 953 6356
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  • Bangkok

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